DIY Farm House Table

My husband and I recently bought a house and now have a giant casual dining room off of the kitchen. Previously, we had opted for barstools around a large extended counter. So I was pretty excited to finally have the kitchen table of my dreams! I wanted a table big enough to sit large amounts of people. I also knew that I wanted to go towards a more Southern farm house feel. Lastly, I knew that I wanted to try and build it ourselves! I immediately looked towards Pinterest. I follow one DIY blogger, Shanty 2 Chic, who has a link to how she built her table for $65! (You can click here for the instructions! They were fairly easy to follow and include a “cut” list. The only thing I would recommend is cutting the largest pieces first. We did all the small ones first and then had to buy more wood because I didn’t account for the large ones both fitting on one board).

We ended up spending a little more because we bought a high quality white paint for the base, rather than stain it like the original tutorial suggested. We also opted for a slightly higher quality of wood. However, that said, we built it for about $125! Of course, that doesn’t include the tools we bought, but we counted those as “good husband” gifts. Michael definitely deserved them!! We also opted to use a stain we already had, leftover from my Coffee Bar project. So that saved us a few dollars.

Anyways, we had SUCH a blast building this table. It was so exciting watching it come to life in front of us. (I also did a time lapse video of part of our adventure so you could enjoy it too!) This week we are building matching benches, so stay tuned!! I’m so thrilled that it will all be done in time for Christmas! We have lots of people coming and I need somewhere to feed them! We should be able to fit 4-5 people per bench comfortably. Eventually I am going to add captains chairs on each end, but I haven’t found any that I love for less than $1,000 a piece… and that’s just not an option seeing how we’re about to have a toddler running through the house wiping who knows what where!

((Also, I’m loving my simple holiday center piece. The eucalyptus is leftover from my Eucalyptus Wreath project and the red berries that I wove in were $.49 per branch at hobby lobby! The Dino salt shakers were from sweet Sophie for Michael’s birthday! Let’s go Christmas! I’m ready for ya.))

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DIY Eucalyptus Wreath

Last month one of my girlfriends saved me a gorgeous floral piece from a wedding she planned. It was a strand of eucalyptus branches wired together into one long vine. I was so excited! It’s seriously like nine feet long! I knew that I had enough for a project or two so I started with a door wreath for Spring/Summer. I recently made a Christmas wreath (you can find the tutorial here) so I knew I could find a great deal at Hobby Lobby on the two things I needed. I picked up my floral wire and a wreath base on a mommy crafting day with Sophie!

When we got home I laid the base down and held one end of the eucalyptus vine against it while winding it around the metal to see how much I needed to cut off. I gave myself an extra inch of overlap as well. Then I just snipped through.

Next, I cut about seven inches of the floral wire off. I threaded it between one of the gaps in the wire, over and around the vine, and then back through the wire base. Then I tied it off twice. After that I wrapped the remaining wire around the base for extra security.

I did that about seven times until the entire vine was secure! That was literally it!! I may add something to it later, but for now I love how simple it looks (and is to make)!

For those of you who do not have a pre-made vine (which I’ve seen at some crafting store if you’re okay with fake leaves) then it’ll take a little longer. If you’re starting with just branches you have to individually wire each branch to the base. It will still be gorgeous, just time consuming. (You would just lay all the branches in one direction, using the fullest part of each branch to cover the stem of the last).

I am so excited about this win! Thanks Brittany for surprising me with the eucalyptus! I’m obsessed.

Supplies List:

  • Eucalyptus
  • Floral Wire $3.99
  • Metal Wreath Base $4.99
  • Scissors (already owned)

* I had my eucalyptus already, but if you’re not recycling a floral piece like me you can buy eucalyptus at Whole Foods or most floral shops. You can also buy realistic looking plastic eucalyptus at Joann’s and Hobby Lobby!

Late Fall Rosebush Transplant: a DIY Attempt 

Recently Michael’s long time best friend & his wife bought a super cute house. Along one side of the house were six huge and gorgeous  rosebushes.  Luckily for me, they hated them! I seriously have zero clue why. They are pink, which is not my absolute favorite, but the height and amount of blooms on these bushes is amazing. So I told them if they didn’t want them I would come dig them out ((read: Michael will dig them out and  will attempt to help)). So when they text us asking us if we were serious we jumped on it!

I know nothing about transplanting rosebushes so I pulled up google and spent a solid hour trying to understand what I needed. From what I gathered, this is really not the ideal time to move the bushes.  You generally would want to move these in late winter/early spring when the chance of a frost is over.  However, one of the people I talked to told me he wouldn’t be worried about it as long as I trimmed the bush back pretty aggressively (the idea is that the plant won’t be trying to sustain every leaf or bloom, instead it’s energy can be focused on the roots and trunk of the plant. Another resource told me that I could cover the bushes for the first little while during cold nights to buy the root system more time. The goal is to not totally shock the plant.

I also read that roses don’t like “wet feet” so there needs to be good drainage. Our soil leans more towards clay, so we bought something to help water drain.  It wasn’t very expensive at all (I’ll list everything we bought and the price at the end of this post).  Roses also need sun exposure, to be planted where other things are not too close to prevent the roots from being choked, and a more acidic and organically composed soil.  Everything I read said the same thing.

So now that I was feeling a little more prepared we headed down to Lowes.  We bought all of our supplies and then headed home.  First we had to clear out a spot for the six bushes.  I had a few ideas, but ultimately decided they should line the deck. Currently there was a thick bed of ivy. I honestly had no idea how much there was until I started trying to pull it out.  I ended up having to use the hoe to rip out as much as I could and loosen the soil. Then Michael and I used our hands to pull everything else out. After that I raked the new bed so it would be somewhat flat.

Next, Michael was a great sport and dug our holes.  At first we were just using a spade, however, then we remembered the post digger took we bought for our mailbox project! It worked like a champ. This took an entire afternoon and it was getting dark so we had to call it a night.  I could barely contain my excitement.  It looked so good!

The next day, Sunday, we headed over to dig out the roses after church. I started by trimming the branches down heavily. This was recommended to me by my step mom and the nursery worker at Lowes. They both said that the roots will have access to more energy if the plant isn’t trying to keep every leaf alive. Plus, it made it way easier to transport!  Next, we dug around the base of the plant. The trick is to dig deep enough from the side that you can go underthe roots. I was so impressed with ourselves! We were able to save huge portions of the root systems. I feel very confident about their chance of survival.

((I am so proud of this before and after!! Also, without the pink roses the brick looks like a totally different color! I think that is so crazy.))

After that we loaded them onto the roof of the jeep and tied them down. Luckily we only had a ten minute drive! When we got home we set about to plant them. I put a handful of the Perlite Miracle grow and a handful of the flower food (specifically for roses) into each hole and worked it into the soil. (Since I was doing two products I did less than the recommended amount to avoid harming the plants). Then I held the bushes upright as Michael filled the hole with a mixture of the original soil and our Evergreen soil conditioner. After they were all planted we watered them heavily. I know that they don’t like “wet feet” normally, but I thought they needed a good dose to get them started!

I am so excited. I think they look amazing. It will be so fun watching them grow over the next few years. I hope it doesn’t take them too incredibly long to grow back to their former glory! I will keep you updated- and if you have any advice I would loveto hear it!! Have a great day.

Lowes Shopping List:

Total Costs: $131.54

* We only ended up using two bags of the Evergreen, but with all the spring projects I have planned it will be used!